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International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

Origin

The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy. The aim of the organisation was to devise a system for transcribing the sounds of speech which was independent of any particular language and applicable to all languages.

A phonetic script for English created in 1847 by Isaac Pitman and Henry Ellis was used as a model for the IPA.

Uses

  • The IPA is used in dictionaries to indicate the pronunciation of words.
  • The IPA has often been used as a basis for creating new writing systems for previously unwritten languages.
  • The IPA is used in some foreign language text books and phrase books to transcribe the sounds of languages which are written with non-latin alphabets. It is also used by non-native speakers of English when learning to speak English.

IPA pulmonic consonants

Where symbols appear in pairs, the one on the right represents a voiced consonant, while the one on the left is unvoiced. Shaded areas denote articulations judged to be impossible.

IPA non-pulmonic consonants and other symbols

IPA diacritics

IPA vowels, suprasegmentals and tone accents

Download an Excel spreadsheet containing the IPA

How the sounds of English are represented by the IPA

books   Recommended books about phonetics and phonology

Links

Information about the IPA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet
http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/ipa-pronunciation-lessons.php
http://cmed.faculty.ku.edu/acdapres/rabeipa/index.html
https://linguischtick.wordpress.com/ipa/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBo5LAVYtX4

UCLA Phonetics Lab Data
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/

IPA charts (include recordings of each phoneme)
http://www.paulmeier.com/ipa/charts.html
http://www.shef.ac.uk/ipa/symbols.php
http://www.linguiste.org/phonetics/ipa/chart/keyboard/
http://www.ipa.webstuff.org/

IPA, International Phonetic Association
http://www.langsci.ucl.ac.uk/ipa/

Free IPA fonts
http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&id=FontDownloadsIPA
http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/wells/fonts.htm
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_IPA.html

IPA-4-Linguists - a guide to using the IPA on your computer
http://ipa4linguists.pbworks.com/

IPA trainer
http://www.ipatrainer.com/

Online IPA input
http://ipa.typeit.org/
http://www.i2speak.com/
http://weston.ruter.net/projects/ipa-chart/view/keyboard/

Representation of IPA with ASCII
http://www.blahedo.org/ascii-ipa.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-SAMPA

IPA transcription
http://learn-foreign-language-phonetics.com/index.php?site_language=english
http://easypronunciation.com/en/ipa-phonetic-transcription-converters

Phonetic alphabets

International Phonetic Alphabet, Visible Speech

 

English

English is a West Germanic language related to Scots, Dutch, Frisian and German. with a significant amount of vocabulary from Old Norse, Norman French, Latin and Greek, and loanwords from many other languages.

Approximately 341 million people speak English as a native language and a further 267 million speak it as a second language in over 104 countries including the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Cameroon, Canada, Cayman Islands, and the Cook Islands.

A brief history of English

Old English

English evolved from the Germanic languages brought to Britain by the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and other Germanic tribes from about the 5th Century AD. These languages are known collectively as Anglo-Saxon or Old English, and began to appear in writing during the 5th century AD.

English acquired vocabulary from Old Norse after Norsemen starting settling in parts of Britain, particularly in the north and east, from the 9th century. To this day varieties of English spoken in northern England contain more words of Norse origin than other varieties of English. They are also said to retain some aspects of pronunciation from Old Norse.

More details of Old English

Middle English

The Norman invasion of 1066 brought with it a deluge of Norman and Latin vocabulary, and for the next three centuries English became a mainly oral language spoken by ordinary people, while the nobility spoke Norman, which became Anglo-Norman, and the clergy spoke Latin. When English literature began to reappear in the 13th century the language had lost the inflectional system of Old English, and the spelling had changed under Norman influence. For example, the Old English letters þ (thorn) and ð (eth) were replaced by th or y, is in Ye Olde Shope. This form of English is known as Middle English.

Modern English

By about the 15th century Middle English had evolved into Early Modern English, and continued to absorb numerous words from other languages, especially from Latin and Greek. Printing was introduced to Britain by William Caxton in around 1469, and as a result written English became increasingly standardised. The first English dictionary, Robert Cawdrey's Table Alphabeticall, was published in 1604.

During the medieval and early modern periods English spread from England to Wales, Scotland and other parts of the British Isles, and also to Ireland. From the 17th century English was exported to other parts of the world via trade and colonization, and it developed into new varities wherever it went. English-based pidgins and creoles also developed in many places, such as on islands in the Caribbean and Pacific, and in parts of Africa.

Modern English alphabet

English alphabet

A recording of the English alphabet by Ng Kiat Quan (American English)

A recording of the English alphabet by Kieran Booth from Brisbane, Australia

Pronunciation

Vowels and diphthongs

This chart shows the vowels and diphthongs used in standard varieties of English spoken in the USA, Australia, England, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, Scotland and Wales. There is significant variation in the vowel sounds used within most of these countries, and in other countries where English is spoken.

English vowels and diphthongs

Source: http://www.soundcomparisons.com/

Key

AmE = American English (General American), AuE = Australian English, BrE = British English (RP), CaE = Canadian English, IrE = Irish English, NZE = New Zealand English, SAE = South African English, ScE = Scottish English, WeE = Welsh English

A recording of English vowels by Ng Kiat Quan (American English)

A recording of the English consonants by Kieran Booth from Brisbane, Australia

Consonants

English consonants

A recording of English consonants by Ng Kiat Quan (American English)

A recording of the English consonants by Kieran Booth from Brisbane, Australia

Sample text in English

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.
(Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights)

Phonetic transcription (British pronunciation)

[ɔːl ˈhjuːmən ˈbiːɪŋz ə bɔːn friː ənd ˈiːkwəl ɪn ˈdɪgnɪtɪ ənd raɪts ðeɪ ə ɪnˈdaʊd wɪð ˈriːzn ənd ˈkɒnʃəns ənd ʃʊd ækt təˈwɔːdz wʌn əˈnʌðə ɪn ə ˈspɪrɪt ɒv ˈbrʌðəhʊd]

Phonetic transcription (American pronunciation)

[ɔːl ˈhjuːmən ˈbiːɪŋz ɑːr bɔːrn friː ænd ˈiːkwəl ɪn ˈdɪgnɪtiː ænd raɪts ðeɪ ɑːr enˈdaʊd wɪð ˈriːzən ænd ˈkɑːnʃəns ænd ʃʊd ækt təˈwɔːrdz wʌn əˈnʌðər ɪn ə ˈspɪrɪt əv brʌðərˌhʊd]

Recordings of this text

British English by Simon Ager (Received Pronunication)

American English by Crawford J. Bennett, Jr.

Australian English by Alexander Leon from Sydney, Australia

Australian English by Timothy Goldsmith from Adelaide, Australia

Australian English by Kieran Booth from Brisbane, Australia

Canadian English by A. Max Sacke

South African English by Michael Koeberg from South Africa

Indian English by Mohammad Shakeb Baig from Bhopal in India

If you speak another variety of English or with a different accent, it would be great to have a recording of this text. Please send it to feedback[at]omniglot[dot]com.

Information about English | British English phrases | Tower of Babel in English | Books about English | English-related links

http://www.arabicgenie.com

 

Links

History of the English Language
http://oxforddictionaries.com/page/thehistoryofenglish/the-history-of-english
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_English_language

Online English language courses
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/
http://www.english-language-school.info/
http://www.eslcafe.com/search/Online_English_Courses/
http://www.speaklanguages.com/english/
http://www.polite-english.com/
http://www.english-daily.com/
http://www.english-portal.com/
http://www.englishgateway.com/
http://englishtalk.info/
http://www.englishleap.com/resources
http://www.teatime-mag.com/
http://www.urdu-english.com/lessons.php
http://blog.clarity-speech.com/
http://www.theenglishalley.es/
http://www.conquerenglish.com/
http://www.englishokay.com/

 

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

Origin

The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy. The aim of the organisation was to devise a system for transcribing the sounds of speech which was independent of any particular language and applicable to all languages.

A phonetic script for English created in 1847 by Isaac Pitman and Henry Ellis was used as a model for the IPA.

Uses

  • The IPA is used in dictionaries to indicate the pronunciation of words.
  • The IPA has often been used as a basis for creating new writing systems for previously unwritten languages.
  • The IPA is used in some foreign language text books and phrase books to transcribe the sounds of languages which are written with non-latin alphabets. It is also used by non-native speakers of English when learning to speak English.

IPA pulmonic consonants

Where symbols appear in pairs, the one on the right represents a voiced consonant, while the one on the left is unvoiced. Shaded areas denote articulations judged to be impossible.

IPA non-pulmonic consonants and other symbols

IPA diacritics

IPA vowels, suprasegmentals and tone accents

Download an Excel spreadsheet containing the IPA

How the sounds of English are represented by the IPA

books   Recommended books about phonetics and phonology

Links

Information about the IPA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet
http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/ipa-pronunciation-lessons.php
http://cmed.faculty.ku.edu/acdapres/rabeipa/index.html
https://linguischtick.wordpress.com/ipa/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBo5LAVYtX4

UCLA Phonetics Lab Data
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/

IPA charts (include recordings of each phoneme)
http://www.paulmeier.com/ipa/charts.html
http://www.shef.ac.uk/ipa/symbols.php
http://www.linguiste.org/phonetics/ipa/chart/keyboard/
http://www.ipa.webstuff.org/

IPA, International Phonetic Association
http://www.langsci.ucl.ac.uk/ipa/

Free IPA fonts
http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&id=FontDownloadsIPA
http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/wells/fonts.htm
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_IPA.html

IPA-4-Linguists - a guide to using the IPA on your computer
http://ipa4linguists.pbworks.com/

IPA trainer
http://www.ipatrainer.com/

Online IPA input
http://ipa.typeit.org/
http://www.i2speak.com/
http://weston.ruter.net/projects/ipa-chart/view/keyboard/

Representation of IPA with ASCII
http://www.blahedo.org/ascii-ipa.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-SAMPA

IPA transcription
http://learn-foreign-language-phonetics.com/index.php?site_language=english
http://easypronunciation.com/en/ipa-phonetic-transcription-converters

Phonetic alphabets

International Phonetic Alphabet, Visible Speech

 

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

Origin

The IPA was first published in 1888 by the Association Phonétique Internationale (International Phonetic Association), a group of French language teachers founded by Paul Passy. The aim of the organisation was to devise a system for transcribing the sounds of speech which was independent of any particular language and applicable to all languages.

A phonetic script for English created in 1847 by Isaac Pitman and Henry Ellis was used as a model for the IPA.

Uses

  • The IPA is used in dictionaries to indicate the pronunciation of words.
  • The IPA has often been used as a basis for creating new writing systems for previously unwritten languages.
  • The IPA is used in some foreign language text books and phrase books to transcribe the sounds of languages which are written with non-latin alphabets. It is also used by non-native speakers of English when learning to speak English.

IPA pulmonic consonants

Where symbols appear in pairs, the one on the right represents a voiced consonant, while the one on the left is unvoiced. Shaded areas denote articulations judged to be impossible.

IPA non-pulmonic consonants and other symbols

IPA diacritics

IPA vowels, suprasegmentals and tone accents

Download an Excel spreadsheet containing the IPA

How the sounds of English are represented by the IPA

books   Recommended books about phonetics and phonology

Links

Information about the IPA
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet
http://www.nativlang.com/linguistics/ipa-pronunciation-lessons.php
http://cmed.faculty.ku.edu/acdapres/rabeipa/index.html
https://linguischtick.wordpress.com/ipa/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PBo5LAVYtX4

UCLA Phonetics Lab Data
http://www.phonetics.ucla.edu/

IPA charts (include recordings of each phoneme)
http://www.paulmeier.com/ipa/charts.html
http://www.shef.ac.uk/ipa/symbols.php
http://www.linguiste.org/phonetics/ipa/chart/keyboard/
http://www.ipa.webstuff.org/

IPA, International Phonetic Association
http://www.langsci.ucl.ac.uk/ipa/

Free IPA fonts
http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&id=FontDownloadsIPA
http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/wells/fonts.htm
http://www.wazu.jp/gallery/Fonts_IPA.html

IPA-4-Linguists - a guide to using the IPA on your computer
http://ipa4linguists.pbworks.com/

IPA trainer
http://www.ipatrainer.com/

Online IPA input
http://ipa.typeit.org/
http://www.i2speak.com/
http://weston.ruter.net/projects/ipa-chart/view/keyboard/

Representation of IPA with ASCII
http://www.blahedo.org/ascii-ipa.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-SAMPA

IPA transcription
http://learn-foreign-language-phonetics.com/index.php?site_language=english
http://easypronunciation.com/en/ipa-phonetic-transcription-converters

Phonetic alphabets

International Phonetic Alphabet, Visible Speech

 

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